Creative Solutions

Youth Voice

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By, Christian Morales

What is one thing every person has, but might not know how to use? A voice. In some way or form, everyone can express themselves. As a matter of fact, some of the most impactful voices are the ones we either refuse to acknowledge or ones that can’t physically be heard.

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The Trauma of Bullying

By Christian Morales, Youth Development Correspondent

Everyone in some shape or form has been involved in bullying. Whether you witnessed it, were a victim or even were a bully. Kids who are bullied can experience negative physical, school, and mental health issues. I’ve seen first hand what physical issues can come from bullying, most from the amount of stress a person has. Headaches, muscle pains and contractions, digestive upset, and altered immune functionality are real effects that a person can experience through being bullied.

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Meet Chris: Youth Development Correspondent

We are excited to introduce a new series on the Big Thought blog from the perspective of an alumnus from our youth development programs. Chris has been participating in Creative Solutions for several years, helped create a new online platform for youth voice called We the Person, served as an AmeriCorps intern during the summer, and was part of the inaugural Artivism performing arts show this past year. Stay tuned for more of his articles in the future, and get to know him better in this first post…

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Social Emotional Learning: Developing the Whole Individual

Social emotional learning, also known as “soft skills,” isn’t a new phenomenon. But it is rapidly gaining momentum nationally as educators, employers and even economists recognize the value of developing the whole individual, not just academic readiness. In this three-part series, we look at social emotional learning from a human interest standpoint, as a burgeoning local and national movement, and as an investment in the future through a grant from The Wallace Foundation awarded to Dallas ISD and Big Thought to create SEL implementation in the district.

Social Emotional Learning At Work

Here’s a story about emotional redemption: A teenager on probation enters the Creative Solutions 2016 summer program at Southern Methodist University. He’s withdrawn, non-verbal, can’t even make eye contact. He has closed off the world in his attempt to hide behind a broken soul.

Two weeks into his work with Creative Solutions, a partnership with the Dallas County Juvenile Department, SMU and Big Thought that teaches performing and visual arts to teen probates, proves cathartic. He suddenly felt comfortable enough to write down his emotions and recount past traumas through poetry.

“A couple more weeks later and he felt safe enough to share those with his mentors,” says Allison Caldwell, Youth Development Specialist at Big Thought. “During the very last week of the program, he decided that he wanted his words published in the poetry anthology and that his poem was worthy of sharing in front of an audience. His voice shook towards the beginning, but his confidence grew as he felt the support from his peers.”

Writing was the salve, the elixir that helped this teenager overcome depression. “His story is the perfect example of the beginning of a journey towards social emotional growth,” says Caldwell. “He reflected on his emotions and experiences, connected with others, and was beginning to learn how to manage his emotions.”

There you have social emotional learning at work, its transformative powers in full throttle. But what exactly is social emotional learning, and why has it become a national buzz phrase in education? According to CASEL, The Collaborative for Academic, Social and Emotional Learning, “social and emotional learning (SEL) is the process through which children and adults acquire and effectively apply the knowledge, attitudes, and skills necessary to understand and manage emotions, set and achieve positive goals, feel and show empathy for others, establish and maintain positive relationships, and make responsible decisions.”

Caldwell has spent more than five years applying social emotional learning to her work with Creative Solutions and DaVerse Lounge, the spoken word program for middle and high school students in partnership with Journeyman Ink.

“Social emotional skills exist on a continuum – you can never truly master a skill, rather you continue to deepen your understanding of yourself and your relationships as you practice social and emotional competencies,” she says. “All of our programs at Big Thought are infused with opportunities for kids to develop SEL skills.”

Photo: Creative Solutions students triumph onstage after last summer’s “The Island of Lost Souls” performance at Southern Methodist University. Photo by Can Turkyilmaz @turk_studio.


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The Art of Teaching: Meet Holly Lapinski

Home Base: Wylie

Big Thought Teaching History: 16 years, incorporating Learning Partners, Creative Solutions, Make a Connection Through Art programs. Now Creative Solutions, including the summer program at Southern Methodist University and other CS assignments.

Education: Bachelor of Arts in Art from Montana State University.

Teaching Philosophy: “I just really want them to have a positive experience,” Holly says. “I want to share what I do with young people. It’s really all about feeding into what we become as adults and their place in society as a whole. We need to expose kids to art, to a creative outlet, so they can develop an interest in something other than getting in trouble. I want them to have something positive to focus on so they can make better choices and have great opportunities.”

Why is Big Thought Important? “Big Thought is a great connection to the local arts world. Meeting somebody that was part of Young Audiences of North Texas, as the organization was at that time, connected me to the arts community. That community is small compared to the overall population. Big Thought gave me what I always wanted, to be part of citywide arts and make art with kids. I make a big mess with the kids and then send them home.”

Rewards of Teaching Big Thought Students: “When I take the kids through pottery, which is a long process, and they see it all done they realize they have made something that lasts or is even useful,” she says. “It’s such an incredible experience for them. You take this lump of clay and sometimes it takes weeks to get things finished. When I open the kiln and all their pieces are in there, it’s amazing that these kids didn’t know anything at first, and now they feel so much pride in their work. It’s also important for kids to have the experience of doing something that isn’t instant gratification. It’s really satisfying to teach them an art form that rewards patience.”

– Mario Tarradell

Photo: Holly Lapinski imparts her knowledge of art with two students at an art exhibit. 

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Making Creativity Count: New Year Wishes for Big Thought Kids

By Mario Tarradell, Public Relations & Marketing Manager

There’s no stopping the New Year train now. The holidays are rapidly becoming a rear view mirror memory and January 2017 is already cruising along. We have about 360 days to make a mark, to make our imagination and creativity count.

So with that in mind, we at Big Thought are of course thinking of the kids that we serve. We have those young lives foremost in our hearts. Our mission, our programs, our efforts are all about enriching their abilities to learn. We are ramping up our six programs – Creative Solutions, Dallas City of Learning, DaVerse Lounge, Learning Partners, Library Live! and Thriving Minds – for another year of greatness.

Some of our Big Thought staffers got to pondering those opportunities for so many kids in Dallas. They filled in the rest of this sentence:

My New Year wish for our kids is…

…that they find the spark that ignites their passion and the world unfurls its red carpet on their path to pursuing that passion.
Leila Wright, Senior Manager, Programs

…that they regularly experience joy.
Anne Leary, Major Gifts Officer

…to lead extraordinary journeys in life with harmony, hope and love.
Mary Hernandez, Community Engagement Specialist

…that their imagination be sparked so they experience the joys of life-long learning.
LeAnn Binford, Director of Big Thought Institute

…that they will find inspiration and a spark that ignites a passion.
Brandon McKnight, Graphic Designer

…that they never suffer, and live a happy life full of cool adventures, laughter, love and childish play for their rest of their beautiful lives.
Jose Sosa, Communications Manager

…that they feel successful in at least one way, each and every day.
Kristina Dove, Program Manager, Partner Relations

Photo credit: Brandon McKnight/Big Thought

bigthoughtMaking Creativity Count: New Year Wishes for Big Thought Kids
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